Actinidia

Contrary to what one might think, the actinidia is a climbing plant that grows well even at higher latitudes and produces with no problems!
Common name : Actinidia
Scientific name : Actinidia spp.
Family : Actinidiaceae
Category : Fruit plants
Type of plant : Perennial
Edible
Edible
Minimal water
Minimal water
Large pot
Large pot
Actinidia belongs to the family Actinidiaceae, the same genus as the kiwi. The most well-known is the Actinidia deliciosa with their fuzzy skin covered in stiff, brown hairs. The actinia blooms in spring and kiwifruit can be picked in fall and winter. It needs fine, rich soil and prefers a sheltered, sunny space! To grow fruit, male and female flowers need to be planted in close proximity.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Harvestint

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 6a
Height 150 - 500
pH 7

Identify my actinidia

Actinidia is a genus of plants of the Actinidiaceae family — a liana which produces kiwi fruit! Many species produce edible kiwis. Among the most well known are Actinidia deliciosa, whose fruit has fuzzy skin, Actinidia chinensis, whose fruit has smooth skin, Actinidia arguta, known as the Siberian kiwi...

Plant my actinidia

Plant your kiwi in spring in possible, especially in regions with cold and rigorous winters. In more temperate zones, you may easily plant your kiwi in autumn, as long as you still avoid any freezing periods. The kiwi loves sunny locations, although a bit of shade in the afternoon can still work. Look for a spot sheltered from prevailing winds! The kiwi needs enriched, well-drained soil. The complicated thing with the kiwi is getting good pollination — without which, no fruit! You should plant one male for every two to six females, and cross your fingers for the wind — and the bees — to be on your side. In any case, be patient — the first kiwi fruits won't appear until the end of a number of years, generally four or five at the minimum. The distinction between the male and female plant can be made by looking at the flowers — the male plant has creamy-white flowers with golden-yellow stamens, while the flowers of the female plant are pure white and comprise 20 to 30 kinds projecting above the ovary. The male plant flowers more abundantly than the female. If you're planting in a pot, look for one with at least a 50 liter capacity.

Mulch my actinidia

In cool climates, protect the base of your kiwi with a good layer of mulch, especially for the first few years! In any case, renew the mulch in spring, as soon as the soil warms up properly.

Trellise my actinidia

The kiwi is a climbing plant that won't climb alone! Therefore, look for a trellis, a pergola or any other support that will allow the liana to cling on, and keep an eye on it's development during it's entire growth period.

Fertilize my actinidia

The kiwi needs a soil fertile enough to grow well. Bring some compost at the end of Winter, or alternatively a granular-type organic fertilizer. Keep in mind that it would be better to make a compost and to incorporate it by "clawing" the top soil.

Prune my actinidia

Pruning plays an important role to help with the fruiting of your kiwi tree, and therefore in the future harvest! Prune after fruiting, typically from December to February, but avoid heavy freezing periods. Keep the most vigorous branches, which will become the framework and the principal trunk. Cut secondary branches that have already produced fruit, leaving only three to four buds. During the summer, you'll eventually be able to carry out a pruning — gently — during fruiting. In July, once the fruits one the tree are at least the size of a cherry, prune each new sprout, leaving four to five buds at most.

Water my actinidia

Kiwis have a great need for water, especially in the first years after planting. Water regularly, and be sure to do so in case of extreme heat.

Propagate my actinidia

You may multiply your kiwi tree by layering...it's easy! Choose a low, healthy, and vigorous branch. At the base, beneath the branch, dig a 20 cm hole. Bend the branch to bring it to the level of the earth, taking care not to break it. Remove the leaves from a section 15 to 20 cm long, then bury it under 5 to 10 cm of soil. To hold it in place, make some small hoops out of gardening wire. Raise the end of the branch vertically and attach it to a support. Don't forget to label the root holes so that you see them when you separate the new plants! Finish by watering thoroughly. Separation is carried out once the new plant has developed strong roots, typically at the start of spring. To do this, cut the branch right next to where it's buried in soil, then carefully dig up the new plant with a small pitchfork.

Reap my actinidia

Kiwis are ripe once their skin yields to gentle finger pressure. Pick them at your rythme. When the first frost arrives, harvest any fruits that remain, as they are not resistant to cold. To keep your kiwis as long as possible, pick them with the help of a pair of scissors — cut them off and leave a part of the stem on the fruit. You can store any fruits that aren't fully mature at 5°C.

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