Aglaonema

Aglaonema is a genus of flowering plants in the arum family, Araceae. They are native to tropical and subtropical regions of Asia and New Guinea and known commonly as Chinese evergreens. One could think they are made of plastic, but no they aren't !
Common name : Aglaonema
Scientific name : Aglaonema
Family : Araceae
Category : Indoor
Type of plant : Perennial
Aglaonema is easy to grow and offers almost guaranteed ornamental foliage. Its flowers and fruits, on the other hand, are of no interest. It is ideal for indoor pot culture - it reaches an average of 50 cm in width. The aglaonema is known to fix certain atmospheric pollutants, but do not be fooled, they do it in infinitesimal quantities, so you will not feel the effect inside. Attention: the sap is irritating to the skin and eyes, while the flowers and fruits are very toxic.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 10a
Height 15 - 100
pH 7

Plant my aglaonema

For the location, you need a bright place protected from direct sun - especially the afternoon - and away from the heaters. Provide a lot of moisture to your Aglaonema - bathroom, tropical greenhouse, porch can suit. Aglaonema is a plant with great development, so chose a large pot - minimum 5 liters. For the planting use potting soil for indoor plant - rather woody - or a beautiful compost well decomposed very woody too, very draining. Water copiously at planting.

Water my aglaonema

The aglaonema is a tropical plant, so water it as soon as the topof the soil dries, and often clean the leaves. If possible, do not use water that is too calcareous. In winter, the plant is almost inactive, so space out the waterings.

Take care of my aglaonema

In dry weather, spray your plant with water not too hard, clean the dust on the leaves: it will be all the more beautiful!

Fertilize my aglaonema

In summer, pour every 2 weeks a liquid fertilizer for green plants - or a good compost juice diluted to 1/10 if you have some! A slow-release fertilizer is possible ... Stop every fertilizing in the fall, and until the end of the following spring.

Repot my aglaonema

At the end of the winter every 2 or 3 years, repot your aglaonéma in a pot slightly larger than the current one, with compost for indoor plants. If you have a beautiful compost well decomposed very woody, very draining, it works too.

Check on my aglaonema

Watch out for the leaves' health: if they are deformed it is either a lack of light or an excess of water. Try both: find a brighter location and reduce watering. The known pests of the philodendron are mealybugs - which hate black soap - and red spiders - which can be limited by spraying water on the leaves. If your aglaonema loses its stems at the base ... it's normal, it's just getting old.

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