Allium aflatunense

Persian onion or Dutch garlic s a species of flowering plant native to Iran widely cultivated as an ornamental for its large umbels of attractive purple flowers.
Common name : Allium aflatunense
Scientific name : Allium aflatunense
Family : Amaryllidaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Flowery
Flowery
Society garlic, or pink agapanthus, is a spectacular bulb. It develops tufts of leaves, embellished or linear, more or less wide that emerge directly from the ground and emit a garlic odor when cut or creased. The leaves will often disappear before or during flowering, from April to August depending on the variety. Around 20 species are commonly grown, short or tall: their height varies from .2 to 1.5m and the flowers have a diameter from 5 to 30 cm. Tall species bloom spherical umbels from 5 to 30 cm in diameter, composed of many small, star-shaped white, yellow, blue or purple flowers. They make pretty bouquets, fresh or dried. They can be planted in flowerbeds with grass or shrubs, and are most beautiful when accompanied by evergreen shrubs. The shorter species, from 20 to 40cm, bloom loose umbels of star or bell flowers, often pendulous and very light.

Sowing & planting

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F
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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 7a
Height 20 - 150
pH 6 - 7

Identify my allium aflatunense

The Allium genus is made up of monocotyledonous plants from the Amaryllidaceae family — but be careful, some authors classify them as Liliaceae! Either way, it's not really important because it doesn't change how to maintain the plant, and that's what we're interested in! The genus is important in human nutrition, and includes many edible, aromatic, and medicinal plants. Leek, onion, cultivated garlic, shallots, spring onions and chives are all members of the Allium genus. This particular guide is about so called "society" garlic, but you will also find all the aforementioned varieties in Groww.

Plant my allium aflatunense

Allium (garlic) bulbs are planted in autumn, between the end of September and the end of November. Plant them with full sun exposure in well-drained, dry, and chalky soil that doesn't hold moisture in the winter. Very study, society garlic can spend the winter outside, even in cold regions, provided the other growing conditions are adequate. It will flourish again for many years. Plant your garlic so it's sheltered from strong winds, and make sure it's away from any shrubs, which may give it unwanted shade. Plant the bulbs at a depth equal to 2 to 3 times their height, ideally in groups of 3 to 7 bulbs. To achieve a beautiful effect, plant densely, leaving 10 cm of space between each bulb. In a flowerbed, you may spread perennials among the garlic to avoid an unsightly hole in your garden, as garlic vegetation disappears in summer. To plant with a bulb dibber, first use it to dig a hole, into which you'll place the bulbs, roots downwards and tip upwards. Refill with the soil that is in the dibbler. If you planting a large area, you may dig up the entire zone to the necessary depth, then place the bulbs at the bottom and gently backfill everything. To improve drainage, you may place your bulbs on a bed of sand, as well as adding some sand or fine gravel to the planting soil. Finally, don't water the bulbs after planting unless the earth is extremely dry — moisture encourages rot! If planting in a pot, use a light substrate made of 1/3 sand, 1/3 potting soil and 1/3 perlite.

Water my allium aflatunense

Keep the soil cool during flowering and for as long as the foliage stays green. Stop any additions or treatment of the soil once the leaves and flowers have wilted.

Cut down my allium aflatunense

Most varieties of society garlic are resistant to temperatures as low as -20°C and prefer to stay where they are all year, so it's unnecessary to bring them in. The wilted flowers are very decorative; you can keep them! But if you'd rather priviledge the reserves of the bulb, or if you don't want your garlic to reseed itself, cut off the flowers.

Fertilize my allium aflatunense

If in poor soil, add natural fertilizer rich in phosphorous and potassium after flowering, when the garlic bulb rebuilds it's reserves. You may also spread non-treated wood ash in winter — approximately 850 ml per 10 m² — to add lye.

Propagate my allium aflatunense

Separating the bulblets is the easiest and quickest way to obtain new bulbs with identical flowers to the mother plant. You'll still need to wait 2 years before you have new, flowering plants. Carry out this operation once the lifecycle of the plant has just finished — all above ground parts will be dried, and the bulb will be dormant. Operate every 3 years in order to regenerate the tufts. Dig up the garlic, gently removing any bulblets from the mother bulb. The bulblets must be planted as soon as possible, outdoors for the largest ones, and in a pot for the smaller ones. It'll take a year or two for them to grow to the size of the adult bulb. Fertilize the young plants with a dosage of natural, potassium-rich fertilizer. Watch for bulb rot — it takes hold particularly easily in damaged areas, causing discolored craters on the bulb, then spreads to the inside. Dust healthy bulbs with wood ash powder; throw out any wounded bulbs.

Weed my allium aflatunense

Sometimes it is necessary to weed a bit! The ornamental garlic will benefit from some care: weed, during the growth period.

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