Arum Lilies

Not to be confused with the Calla Lily of Ethiopia (also known as arum lilies, though of the Zantedeschia genus), species of arum are more or less frost-sensitive perennials, with an ornamental flowering and foliage.
Common name : Arum Lilies
Scientific name : Arum spp.
Family : Araceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Flowery
Flowery
Arum lilies are spring-blooming perennials, known for their remarkable "spathe" - a leaf sheath - enclosing a "spadix" of tiny flowers. Among the ornamental species, only Arum italicum is very adapted to the wild. The others are most sensitive to frost, and must therefore be protected during harsh winters. Grow them in the garden, in the shade, in well-drained soil rich in humus. In a pot, inside, they do well in light soil that is mixed with sand, as well as lots of light. - Keep in mind: Arum maculatum (cuckoo pint) is an invasive species, not particularly easy on the eyes, and should be avoided. Be aware that arums are toxic, and that their sap can cause skin irritations.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 8a
Height 15 - 50
pH 6 - 7

Identify my arum lilies

Arum lilies are perennials that grow from 15 to 50 cm in height, with spear-shaped, occasionally cordiform leaves. Their flowers are spathes that surround the spadix of small flowers, transforming into red, orange or green berries. Don't get it mixed up with calla lilies — from the Zantedeschia genus — which are interior plants!

Plant my arum lilies

Plant in autumn or in spring in well-drained, fertile, and shaded soil, planting the bulbs 15 cm underground. Prepare the soil with some light digging (to decompact without necessarily turning it over with a pitchfork or broadfork), hoeing, and raking. Plant these perennials, leaving half the height of the fully-matured plants between each (verify the precise spacing by reading the label or reading up on your specific cultivar, if possible). Tamp the soil down well so that the roots are not in contact with air, then water generously. If potted, plant in a mixture of potting soil and sand.

Prop my arum lilies

Train any lilies taller than 80 cm in March, otherwise they may droop and sag after rain. A stake and a wire should do the job.

Mulch my arum lilies

Mulching your arum lilies in November will save you from watering and weeding and will even fertilize the soil a bit as it decomposes. For frost-sensitive arum lilies, place a 10 cm layer of mulch or leaves around the plant.

Water my arum lilies

Water for the first month after planting in the spring, and in case of dryness. If indoors, water regularly, as soon as the soil becomes dried.

Weed my arum lilies

In perennial species, weeding also means working your flowerbed – don't let anything develop too quickly to the detriment of others.

Fertilize my arum lilies

With a respectful approach to soil life, it's always better to fertilize a little in advance with organic material that will decompose; spread out a compost that isn't entirely decomposed, with well decomposed manure at the plant's base, and incorporate over 10 cm with a hoe. This operation is carried out in winter so that earthworms and bacteria have enough time to do their job.

Propagate my arum lilies

Harvest the seeds if you'd like to propagate your arum lilies! Multiply them by seeding in a pot under a cold frame in autumn or spring, after removing the caustic external flesh of the berries, then transplanting them in open soil after the last freeze. Keep the pots humid for the first few weeks.

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