Bamboo

Bamboo, the most essential element for feeding your growing panda!
Common name : Bamboo
Scientific name : Phyllostachys
Family : Poaceae
Category : Shrubs
Type of plant : Perennial
Evergreen
Evergreen
Invader
Invader
Large pot
Large pot
Bamboo brings together a number of genera: Phyllostachys, Sasa, Arundinaria, and Fargesia, which explains their diverse behavior in the garden. Some can be trimmed, others not so much, and most are even invasive, excluding fargesia, which grows in clumps. They are evergreen and don't require any particular care except for clearing rhizomes if a barrier wasn't installed beforehand, and regularly trimming old stems.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 6a
Height 100 - 2000
pH 6 - 7

Identify my bamboo

Bamboo is orginally from Asia — it's the core of the pandas' diet! It's perfectly straight stalks and mostly narrow leaves give it great density. All bamboo have underground stems that we call rhizomes. The rhizomes are the storage organs for the bamboo. The roots are called "adventitious" — meaning that they develop around the nodes of the rhizome. Some varieties are called "leptomorphs", or "running roots", and we want to keep them out of our gardens to avoid invasion! Others, such as Fargesia are known as "pachymorphs", or "clumping roots", and won't spread.

Plant my bamboo

Vous pouvez planter vos bambous en pleine terre, mais ils supportent aussi très bien les pots, pourvu qu'ils soient tout de même de taille adaptée ! Plantez en pleine terre en période hors-gel, de préférence en automne; si vous réalisez la plantation au printemps prévoyez un arrosage régulier les premières semaines. Bamoo loves very sunny places and will accept practically any kind of soil — except dry! — with a slight preference for lightly acidic ground. Beware, bamboo of the Phyllostachys, Sasa and Arundinaria genera propagate themselves uncontrollably! In order to avoid a total bamboo invasion of your garden, place an anti-root or anti-rhizome barrier at the bottom of the planting hole, extending to 5 cm beneath the top of the soil on all sides with an angle greater than 15°, so that the roots will grow towards the top instead of going outwards under the barrier. If heavy landsacping scares you, plant bamboo from the Fargesia genus. As a planter, look for a pot or container that will be large enough, and mulch it in a way that conserves moisture. Water regularly.

Water my bamboo

Regularly watering your bamboo during the first two weeks after planting creates favourable conditions for root development and growth. Water your potted bamboo regularly, primarily during the evening, as it is a plant that takes in a lot of water, especially at the start.

Prune my bamboo

If needed, you can prune the height of your bamboo without difficulty — it won't harm the stability of the plant at all and will actually help it grow thicker. Just know that once they've been cut, the canes won't grow anymore — the secondary canes may regrow, but they'll never grow to the size of the original cane. On the other hand, the new canes will give you rhizomes!

Propagate my bamboo

Propagate if you'd like in the spring. Dig out with a clean, preferably disinfected, garden spade, rhizomes at least two years of age, and if possible, choose plants that are not yet covered in hay mulch. Plant this rhizome in the ground, in a planter or in a pot with a mixture of garden soil and potting soil. Water copiously the first few weeks.

Check on my bamboo

Bamboo is not sensitive to disease, but can still be prey to a few insects and parasites, mainly aphids, mealybugs and red spiders: in case of attack, spray a solution of non-calcareous water containing baking soda - 2 tablespoons for 1 liter of water - and black soap.

Mulch my bamboo

Mulch, at least for the first few years, in a way that protects your young plants from the winter cold, and also keeps the soil cool and moist. After a few years, spreading dried straw on the soil will create a natural carpet and you won't have any need to worry!

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