Black Poplar

A beautiful poplar, ‘Wild black’ refers to its dark bark.
Common name : Black Poplar
Scientific name : Populus nigra
Family : Salicaceae
Category : Trees
Type of plant : Perennial
Weed
Weed
Full description for Populus nigra not yet available.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 6a
Height 500 - 3000
pH 6 - 8

Identify my black poplar

Poplars have alternate broad, oval, triangular or diamond-shaped deciduous leaves at the end of long, flexible petioles. These are first-rate trees that carry flowers in February-March, in the form of kittens, before the first leaves. Poplar bark is deeply wrinkled.

Plant my black poplar

Plant in cool, moist, drained or heavy soil, in the sun, not too close to a building. Planting bare roots is only done in winder where as you can plant trees with a root ball and in a container until spring. With bare roots, carry out a treatment (shorten the roots and soak them in a mixture of soil and compost). Plant in a hole that is about 20 cm bigger than the root ball, gradually put the crumbled earth back by regularly tamping down around the roots. Water after planting with at least 50 liters of water that you will pour into a basin formed around the trunk. A tilted stake planted in the hole will be useful against strong winds as long as you don't forget to remove it after 2 year and that you use a supple attachment.

Water my black poplar

In the first month and in case of drought, water abundantly but not too frequently, so that the roots will fetch water deeper. Water thoroughly, until the soil is full and forms a small puddle around the tree.

Unprop my black poplar

Two years after planting, remove the stake.

Mulch my black poplar

If your poplar is planted in dry soil, mulch it every spring with crushed wood.

Prune my black poplar

There is no need to prune poplars. Nevertheless, in winter you can cut the branches that crosses each other, and those that are dead.

Check on my black poplar

Bad news, the poplars are victims of a cohort of diseases almost all intractable ... Some attack the leaves, others the wood. Rust, defoliating caterpillars, insects that burrow and bark ... But hey, how to treat an adult tree without spraying the whole neighborhood? Burn a little candle - or whatever you want - and let your tree get along like an adult. Groww can provide you with a pat on the shoulder, if needed.

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