Chamomile

An easy - yet alas sensitive to frost - cousin of the daisy.
Common name : Chamomile
Scientific name : Anthemis spp.
Family : Asteraceae
Category : Annual
Pruning needed
Pruning needed
Anthemis is a genus of aromatic flowering plants in the family Asteraceae, native to the Mediterranean region and southwest Asia, closely related to Chamaemelum, and like that genus, known by the common name chamomile - some species are also called dog-fennel or mayweed. Several species and cultivars are available for garden use, and mostly Anthemis arvensis - also known as corn chamomile, mayweed, scentless chamomile, or field chamomile - a very popular ornamental plant.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulom├ętrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 15 - 30
pH 7

Identify my chamomile

Anthemis are frosty perennials of the family Asteraceae. Their leaves are usually lanceolate, greyish, lobed, basal. The flowers are grouped in capitules whose ligules are very colorful, sometimes striated. These panicles have the particularity to close as soon as the light drops.

Plant my chamomile

In open soil or in pot? It's simple, if at home the temperature drops permanently below 5 ┬░ C, it will be in pot! It is easily found in the spring, in pots often of already substantial size. Do not leave your anthemis in the original potbut repot it in a slightly larger pot - terracotta! Plant in the spring in a sunny place, in a mixture of potting soil, garden soil and sand. In the open ground for the lucky ones, choose a sunny location, in sandy, light soil. Space the plants of about ten centimeters. Water copiously to facilitate rooting.

Water my chamomile

In pots indoors, water two or three times a week in season, once every ten days in winter. In the open soil, watering is not necessary, except in case of intense drought.

Take care of my chamomile

No mulching for the anthemis, which does not appreciate it. No fertilizer either, or a simple amendment for potted plants. Simple to cultivate, we said!

Pinch my chamomile

Vigilant deadheading once or twice a week will prolong the blooming period !

Prune my chamomile

In March, before the vegetation regrows, prune the anthemis with shears to restore its compact, globally spherical shape.

Remove my chamomile

If your anthemis is in open soil and you dread the frosts, unroot it before you see it freeze! You can put it back in a pot, by taking out the whole root ball (without breaking or cracking it, if possible) using a spade. You should put the pot in not heated shelter for the winter.

Shelter my chamomile

Shelter pots as soon as temperatures drop, in a cool, dry place. Leave it there until spring.

Put outside my chamomile

Find it a sheltered and sunny spot outside.

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