Common pink

The pink-coloured flowers in the family! Although some cultivars, of course, are on the market with other colours - like ‘Lady in Red’ or ‘Haytor white’.
Common name : Common pink
Scientific name : Dianthus cv.
Family : Caryophyllaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Sun loving
Sun loving
Frost resistant
Frost resistant
Extra water
Extra water
A compact member of the Dianthus genus, common pink is a ground cover evergreen reaching on average 30–60 centimetres (12–24 in) of height, with opposite, simple, linear and sessile, 10 centimetres (3.9 in) long leaves and pink (for the type species) 10–15 millimetres (0.39–0.59 in) wide flowers, with fringed margins from May through August.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 5a
Height 20 - 40
pH 6 - 7

Identify my common pink

The old common pink are persistent, vigorous, and most form compact domes. Each flowering stem bears in June from 4 to 6 single, double or semi-double flowers, scented, 3 to 6 cm in diameter. They can be "unicolour", "two-toned" or "nuanced". Modern common pink have a compact rounded tuft habit, 3-6 cm flowers, which come in two or three waves of bloom from June to October.

Sow my common pink

Common pink are biennials or ephemeral perennials used in biannuals are sown in place in autumn, or under shelter in March, to obtain a bloom the same year. Cover with a very shallow layer of compost because seeds need light to germinate.

Dibble my common pink

Plant the seedling between two and four weeks after planting (as soon as the plant is sufficiently developed to be handled). Carefully separate the seedlings and replant individually in a bucket filled with transplanting soil, or a mixture of soil and well-decomposed compost. Water copiously at the plantation, then every day during the first weeks.

Plant my common pink

About two months after sowing, and 6 weeks after transplanting, the plants have grown strong enough to be placed in the open soil. Plant them in finely worked beds (spaded, scratched and raked), when the last spring frosts are over. Once the bed is properly prepared, make a small hole with a transplanter, remove the plant from its bucket, put it in the hole, and compact the soil to put it in contact with the roots. Respect a spacing between the plants corresponding to one third of its intended width. Water copiously to promote rooting.

Mulch my common pink

The potted common pink outside needs to be protected from the cold weather. In early winter, bring them in, or wrap them in insulation material.

Water my common pink

Keep the soil moist - watering in fine mist - until seedling emergence, then water about once a week, allowing the soil to dry between two waterings. Summer watering is only necessary in case of hot weather, or for potted plants of course, to enhance flowering.

Propagate my common pink

The common pink is multiplyed by seed, so consider harvesting seeds in summer, and sowing them under shelter from February. Beware, some hybrids have low fertility, so you may need to get new seeds.

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