Coneflowers

Easy and hardy black-eyed yellow flowers.
Common name : Coneflowers
Scientific name : Rudbeckia spp.
Family : Asteraceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Flowery
Flowery
Frost resistant
Frost resistant
Full description for Rudbeckia spp. not yet available.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 5a
Height 100 - 300
pH 7 - 8

Plant my coneflowers

Prepare the soil by digging (to decompact without necessarily turning it upside down, with a pichfork or a broadfork), a scratching and a raking. Add an amendment, if the soil is not very rich. Plant the perennials at a spacing of 1/3 of the adult height between plants. Thoroughly tamp the soil to remove air around the roots, then water abundantly.

Water my coneflowers

Water grownup plants until the water that you pour does not rush into the ground, and forms a small puddleto their fill, even if it is less frequent. Unless otherwise specified, do not wet the foliage: the plants "drink" by their roots. Seedlings should be watered in fine rain. Keep them permanently moist to get germination.

Weed my coneflowers

In perennial species, weeding also means working your flowerbed – don't let anything develop too quickly to the detriment of others.

Cut down my coneflowers

Deciduous perennials don't keep their above-ground growth during the winter, they survive with their underground systems. At the end of the season, the foliage and the dried flower stems can be cut off without second thought. Don't touch the root or the future buds that are emerging from the soil

Fertilize my coneflowers

The rudbeckias are easy - nevertheless you can give them a boost in a simple way. With a respectful approach to soil life, it's always better to fertilize a little in advance with organic material that will decompose; spread out a compost that isn't entirely decomposed, with well decomposed manure at the plant's base, and incorporate over 10 cm with a hoe. This operation is carried out in winter so that earthworms and bacteria have enough time to do their job.

Propagate my coneflowers

The rudbeckias grow rapidly, in 2 years the resulting plant is bulky. The division is interesting to renew the plant, share with other gardeners or replant cheaply in another place in the garden! Divide the tuft in the fall or spring, using a spade, depending on its development, its size, and your desires. This will, in addition to multiplying it, lighten it. Raise the clod using a spade. Plant the spade about twenty centimeters from the tuft, press and lift. If the soil is heavy, proceed in several steps around the root ball. Remove faded flowers and dry or damaged stems. Split the tuft into two parts with a straight spade. Prepare a loosened hole in the earth to accommodate the 'new subject'. The supply of fertilizer is not essential even if some compost will not hurt. Tamp the earth around the foot. Water the plantation abundantly and ensure watering in the early stages if it does not rain in quantity. The recovery is usually easy.

Mulch my coneflowers

Mulching the perennial plants will save you from watering and weeding and will even fertilize the soil a bit as it decomposes. When choosing, know that dry wood chips are the most inert, but they will last for a longer time. Fresh wood chips and leaves enrich the soil but must be changed often. Grass cuttings are to be used mixed with something else in a layer that is at most 1 cm thick. Mulch with a thickness of at least 5 cm to provide a good level of efficiency.

Check on my coneflowers

Slugs and snails are fond of young shoots of rudbeckias. They pierce and cut foliage, consume sprouted seeds, seedlings, foliage and green waste. If you see any, install beer traps or ash barriers.

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