French Tarragon

Forget tarragon under plastic in the shops - grow your own !
Common name : French Tarragon
Scientific name : Artemisia dracunculus
Family : Asteraceae
Category : Veggies
Type of plant : Perennial
Sun loving
Sun loving
Edible
Edible
Urban
Urban
French Tarragon is a woody-based, upright perennial with aromatic leaves and small, nodding, pale yellow flowerheads in late summer.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Harvestint

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulom├ętrie plants.granulometry_3
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 8a
Height 20 - 40
pH 6 - 7

Identify my french tarragon

Tarragon is an herbaceous plant about 80 cm tall, with many stems very branched, narrow-leafed, perennial by its stump. The leaves, narrow, smooth and shiny, dark green, disappear during the winter. French tarragon is often grown for cooking! Russian tarragon, Artemisia dracunculus var. inodora, having less flavor, remains less appreciated.

Repot my french tarragon

If you bought a plant in a store, or got a clump from a neighbor or a friend and want to keep your tarragon potted, replant it immediately after purchase in a simple earthenware pot. Find a bright location, possibly outside, when the last frosts are past due!

Shelter my french tarragon

Your french tarragon needs to be protected from the frost, so place it indoors for the winter, in a bright spot.

Put outside my french tarragon

After the last frosts, gradually put your tarragon out in the light.

Plant my french tarragon

Prefer a sheltered situation from full sun and wind. The soil must be well drained to avoid stagnant water: the best is a mix made of potting soil, with an addition of 10% sand. Tarragon is also perfectly suited for growing indoors, behind a window, or on a balcony, in a pot or in a planter: if you wish to keep it in pots, replant it immediately after purchase in a simple earthen pot. Find a bright location, possibly outside, if the frosts are past due!

Water my french tarragon

Tarragon tolerates drought much better than excess moisture. Water regularly the first weeks to promote rooting, and afterward only when the substrate has become very dry.

Mulch my french tarragon

You can mulch between the plants one to two weeks after planting with the aid of a mulch which holds in moisture. This will limit evaporation from the soil, and thus the need to water and to weed.

Reap my french tarragon

You can pick leaves until the first frost arrives! Preferably choose the most important leaves by pruning a full stem to promote the emergence of new shoots. Remove withered stems too.

Protect my french tarragon

During the winter, cover the base of your plants - which would withstand temperatures below -5 ┬░ C, or mulch them if you want to keep them for the next season. If they are in pots, you can of course shelter them for the winter, and bring them back outside after the last frost!

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