Fritillaria

A spring flowering herbaceous bulbous perennial plants and a relative of the lily.
Common name : Fritillaria
Scientific name : Fritillaria
Family : Liliaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Pruning needed
Pruning needed
Sun loving
Sun loving
Species of Fritillaria are becoming increasingly popular as ornamental garden plants, and many species and cultivars are commercially available. They are usually grown from dormant bulbs planted in Autumn, and repeat flower every year.

Sowing & planting

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F
M
A
M
J
J
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O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 7a
Height 15 - 120
pH 6 - 7

Identify my fritillaria

The fritillary genus has about 100 species of bulbous perennials from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. The bulbs carry scales, sometimes cloves. The leaves have a linear or lanceolate shape, and they are opposite or arranged in whorls. The flowers form a flattened cup or a tube, are pendulous, sometimes grouped in whorls.

Plant my fritillaria

Plant your fritillaries in autumn or spring. They will enjoy a sunny, cool and drained, rather rich location. Add compost before planting if necessary. Indoors, mix fibrous soil, garden soil with sand, and plant in a pot of twenty liters. Place the pot in the light. Plant with an interval of 40 cm for large species, and every 20 cm for small. Mulch right after planting, then water.

Water my fritillaria

Fritillaries, once installed - and especially properly mulched! - do not have large water requirements. In pot however, water during the summer season but without excess, once a week if it is very dry, rather in the morning and sparing the leaves. The first year however, watch the weather, and bring some water if necessary. In pots, water when the top of the soil has dried, usually once a week.

Fertilize my fritillaria

With a respectful approach to soil life, it's always better to fertilize a little in advance with organic material that will decompose; spread out a compost that isn't entirely decomposed, with well decomposed manure at the plant's base, and incorporate over 10 cm with a hoe. This operation is carried out in winter so that earthworms and bacteria have enough time to do their job.

Propagate my fritillaria

The easiest way to multiply fritillaries is to recover in the late summer the cloves that have developed in the middle of the roots. To do this, take out the rootball with a spade, divide the clods and replant them every 10 cm.

Mulch my fritillaria

Mulch the base of chrysanthemums, even in pots! This will prevent you from watering and weeding in summer and it will protect the roots from cold in winter.

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