Garden balsam

A must-have in the garden for its flowers all summer long!
Common name : Garden balsam
Scientific name : Impatiens balsamina
Family : Balsaminaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Invader
Invader
Impatiens balsamina - the garden balsam - is a species of Impatiens native to southern Asia. It is an annual plant growing to 20–75 cm tall, with a thick but soft stem, spirally-arranged, 2.5–9 cm long leaves with a deeply toothed margin and pink, red, mauve, lilac, or white, 2.5–5 cm flowers.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 30 - 80
pH 7

Fertilize my garden balsam

For potted or garden crops, provide fertilizer for flowering plants once a week, from May / June to September. In open soil, it is not necessary to fertilize.

Sow my garden balsam

Sow under cover in a filtered light, between 16 and 18 ° C, in a fairly rich soil. Water once a week.

Dibble my garden balsam

Plant the seedling between two and four weeks after sowing (as soon as the plant is sufficiently developed to be handled). Carefully separate the seedlings and replant individually in a bucket filled with transplanting soil, or a mixture of garden soil and well-decomposed compost. Water copiously at the plantation, then every day during the first weeks.

Plant my garden balsam

About two months after sowing, and 6 weeks after transplanting, the plants have grown strong enough to be placed in the open soil. Plant them in finely worked beds (spaded, scratched and raked), when the last spring frosts are over. Once the bed is properly prepared, make a small hole with a transplanter, remove the plant from its bucket, put it in the hole, and compact the soil to put it in contact with the roots. Respect a spacing between the plants corresponding to one third of its intended width. Water copiously to promote rooting.

Mulch my garden balsam

Mulch between the plants a week or two after transplanting, using dried leaves or wood chips (or any other moisture-conserving mulch). This will limit evaporation from the soil, and thus the need to water and to weed.

Remove my garden balsam

How to pull off: for plants with superficial rooting, just shoot them. If not, help yourself with a spade.

Water my garden balsam

The garden balsam is rather greedy in water and appreciates to be in a ground kept still slightly wet but never soggy. For potted plants, do not let water stagnate in the saucer. Water sowings and seedlings in rain to not uproot them, being careful not to drown them either (beware of undrilled pots at the bottom). Once in open soil or in pots and well developed, the plants will accommodate with a watering jet or watering can, morning or evening. Inside, always be careful not to wet the foliage too much, it would promote diseases.

Propagate my garden balsam

Annuals multiply mainly by sowing, so consider harvesting the seeds in late summer, and sow them again in March.

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