Gladiolus

A wonderful flowering plant, perfect for beddings.
Common name : Gladiolus
Scientific name : Gladiolus
Family : Iridaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Cold-sensitive
Cold-sensitive
Gladiolus - the sword lily - is a genus of perennial flowering plants in the iris family. Gladiolus grows from corms, with stems generally unbranched producing 1 to 9 narrow, sword-shaped, longitudinal grooved leaves enclosed in a sheath. The flowers of wild species vary from very small to perhaps 4 cm in diameter, but some hybrids have spectacular giant flower spikes, with colors ranging from pink to reddish or light purple, white, or orange and yellow.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 6a
Height 50 - 100
pH 6 - 7

Identify my gladiolus

Gladioli are perennials with corms widely used as ornamentals in flowerbeds or for the production of cut flowers. Most species are native to South Africa. Gladiolus means "small sword" in Latin, in reference to the shape of the leaves: the latter are surmounted by an inflorescence in ear.

Plant my gladiolus

Plant the gladiolus in spring and early summer, 10 cm deep, with a spacing of about 20/25 cm between each bulb. Gladioli prefer a rather sunny place - they would not bloom in the shade! - sheltered from the wind and a light soil, fresh and well amended, if possible in sandy ground. It hates fresh manure!

Water my gladiolus

Water after planting - and watch the soil during all growth and flowering, which should never become dry!

Prune my gladiolus

When the foliage has yellowed and not before, cut short! Gladioli need to have the leaves turn yellow to make up their reserves for the next bloom.

Protect my gladiolus

In the fall, unroot, dry and clean the bulbs with a brush, store them in a cool, dark place during the winter and replant them the following spring. If your climate allows it and the winter stays mild - no risk of frost! - you can eventually leave them in the ground all winter long.

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