Ground cover rose

Easy-peasy roses!
Common name : Ground cover rose
Scientific name : Rosa 'couvre-sol'
Family : Rosaceae
Category : Shrubs
Type of plant : Perennial
Ground cover roses - or « landscape roses » - are a group of low-maintenance and easy roses, with minimal pruning needs, natural pest and disease resistance and a lower growing habit. They have been developed in the late 20th century, when traditional hybrid tea and floribunda rose varieties fell out of favour with many gardeners and landscapers, as they require intensive care and chemicals.

Sowing & planting

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F
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Flowering

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D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 5a
Height 20 - 40
pH 6 - 7

Identify my ground cover rose

The so-called ground cover roses are "modern" roses. They carry bouquets of many single or double flowers. Some bloom on the previous year's wood only, while others are up-and-coming. The presence of flowers at one season or another does not help with identification. The most reliable criterion of recognition is their habit, since they form creeping stems, or climbing if they are trellised to a wall. Their leaves are composed of small lustrous and lanceolate leaflets.

Plant my ground cover rose

The planting is done ideally from September to March, in frost-free conditions, especially with bare roots. In this case, a good drench (put mud on the roots) will make a huge difference. Plant in soil that is fertile, cool, well drained, humus rich, and not too chalky in direct sunlight (what do you mean that's asking for the moon?). Prune damaged roots and shorten branches to 25 cm. Plant without burying the root collar, tamp down well around the roots, and water generously when planted. Form a little planting basin if you plant late for watering during the first year.

Fertilize my ground cover rose

Timeless advice from Groww: fertilize as a preventative measure in November. Be reasonable, roses just need a little organic fertilizer (manure, compost, etc), 100g/m² is enough. Nothing is stopping you from testing out a few of your own little recipes (banana peels for minerals, coffee grounds against aphids), but Groww provides no guarantee! Avoid mulching with fresh wood during the blooming period.

Prune my ground cover rose

Creeping roses do not need to be cut very strictly. In February-March shorten the side branches that grow outward, and clear the heart by cutting dead woods.

Water my ground cover rose

Water abundantly but not too frequently, so that the roots will fetch water deeper. Water thoroughly until the soil is wet and a small puddle forms around the tree.

Mulch my ground cover rose

Roses hate competition, so either you love to hoe, and you hoe every two weeks, or you mulch twice a year in order to have 3-4 cm of straw or wood on the ground. Mulch with what you have with a reasonable quantity: a little (very very little) bit of grass cuttings, dry leaves, or even compost, not yet thoroughly decomposed before winter. The importance is to cover.

Check on my ground cover rose

Pay particularly close attention to damage to the bark or the wood. The numerous attacks that your roses are subjected to when it comes to their leaves (black spots, insects, aphids) are less dangerous to their health.

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