Hellebore

Hellebores bloom in the winter - ain’t that cool?
Common name : Hellebore
Scientific name : Helleborus spp.
Family : Ranunculaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Frost resistant
Frost resistant
Commonly known as hellebores, Winter rose or Lenten rose, genus Helleborus consists of approximately 20 species of herbaceous or evergreen perennial flowering plants in the family Ranunculaceae. Hellebores are widely grown in gardens for decorative purposes - the most commonly used being H. orientalis and its hybrids. They are particularly valued by gardeners for their winter and early spring flowering period - the plants are surprisingly frost-resistant and many are evergreen. Also of value is their shade tolerance. Many species of hellebore have green or greenish-purple flowers and are of limited garden value, although Corsican hellebore (H. argutifolius), a robust plant with pale green, cup-shaped flowers and attractive leathery foliage, is widely grown. So is the 'stinking hellebore' or setterwort (H. foetidus), which has drooping clusters of small, pale green, bell-shaped flowers, often edged with maroon, which contrasts with its dark evergreen foliage. H. foetidus 'Wester Flisk', with red-flushed flowers and flower stalks, is becoming popular, as are more recent selections with golden-yellow foliage.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_3
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 6a
Height 30 - 45
pH 6 - 8

Identify my hellebore

Helleborus is a genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae. The genus has between 15 and 22 species according to the authors. The majority of species are found in the Balkans, but two are native to the Mediterranean islands: Helleborus argutifolius, in Corsica and Sardinia, and Helleborus lividus, in the Balearic Islands. This description is more specifically about Helleborus niger, the Christmas Rose.

Plant my hellebore

Plant preferably in the spring. In a pot or tray, on a balcony or terrace, install them in the shadow of a wall, in containers much larger than the plants. Handle the plants with care, take care of the roots that are fragile and must not dry out. Prepare the soil by digging (to decompact without necessarily turning it, with a toothpick or a grelinette), a scratching and raking.Incorporate compost of leaves or compost. Plant them in holes about 40 cm in all directions in a drained soil (where the water does not stagnate) and space the plants about 40 to 50 cm. Tamp the soil well to avoid air from the roots, then water thoroughly.

Water my hellebore

In summer, avoid your hellebores a suffering from drought, especially if you planted them in the spring. Keep the soil moist but do not water too much.

Weed my hellebore

In perennial species, weeding also means working your flowerbed – don't let anything develop too quickly to the detriment of others.

Fertilize my hellebore

Twice a year, in the spring and fall - after and before flowering - add compost or old manure at the base of the plants to stimulate them, because hellebores need rich, humus soils to thrive.

Propagate my hellebore

You can divide after the flowering in March, or in September, except for H. foetidus and H. argutifolius.

Mulch my hellebore

Mulching these perennials will save you from watering and weeding and will even fertilize the soil a bit as it decomposes.. If you are Mulching to keep the soil cool, be careful not to create too much moisture that could cause black rot or leaf stains.

Groww, the plant identification and gardening app