Japanese Quince

A wonderful small flowering shrub.
Common name : Japanese Quince
Scientific name : Chaenomeles japonica
Family : Rosaceae
Category : Shrubs
Type of plant : Perennial
Edible
Edible
Chaenomeles japonica - Maule's quince - is a species of flowering plant in the rose family. It is a thorny deciduous shrub growing to only about 1 m in height, with alternately arranged simple leaves with a serrated margin and red, white, pink or multicoloured flowers in the spring.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 5a
Height 100 - 200
pH 7

Identify my japanese quince

Small, deciduous, spiny tree measuring 1 to 2 meters long, with alternate, simple leaves, and red flowers blooming at the beginning of spring!

Plant my japanese quince

The quince tree of Japan likes open soil, and appreciates sheltered and sunny spots, but not hot! It supports tray culture. Before planting, trim damaged roots and branches to balance root volume and foliage volume. Plant in a hole at least twice as big as the root ball. Soaking roots before planting will greatly improve the chances of recovery. Be careful not to bury the base of the stems. Form a hollow around the plant, which will be used for watering during the first months. Tamp the soil - do not hesitate to use all the weight of the body! Finally water until filling the hollow you shaped, at least two watering cans!

Prune my japanese quince

Prune right after flowering! Remove the faded flowers, and just give your plant a compact shape.

Water my japanese quince

Water thoroughly the first few weeks. Beyond the first year, you shouldn't need to worry about it. Water copiously but infrequently to encourage the root system to seek water deep underground. It's therefore suitable to water until the planting basin is full and only empties slowly.

Mulch my japanese quince

Mulch with compost or well decomposed manure in the fall, and with what you have at hand in the spring - dry grass clippings do the trick!

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