Lilac

Lilac will enchant your garden in springtime, attracting birds and the first bees of the season.
Common name : Lilac
Scientific name : Syringa vulgaris
Family : Oleaceae
Category : Shrubs
Type of plant : Perennial
Flowery
Flowery
A lovely, generously flowering shrub in the form of a bunch of grapes, and very fragrant, great for making bouquets for the home. A blooming lilac is the signal for a gardener to go ahead with planting his cold-sensitive plants. Find this plant a bright spot in rich, drained soil.

Sowing & planting

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F
M
A
M
J
J
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D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 5a
Height 150 - 700
pH 7

Identify my lilac

Lilacs are shrubs — often less than 3 meters high — whose flower color can be several shades of mauve, purple, and white. The most well-known lilac is the common lilac or French lilac — syringa vulgaris, which we speak about here!

Plant my lilac

It is preferable to plant lilacs in autumn to encourage rooting, but like many shrubs bought in a container, you can also plant year round provided that you water more if you decide to plant in the spring or during summer. Lilacs like direct sunlight to flower well. A rich and well drained soil will improve its development and its flowering. It's best to plant it at the end of autumn or in winter, in thawed soil, during the plant's dormant period. Before planting, trim damaged roots and branches to balance the root volume and the above ground volume. Plant in a hole at least two times bigger than the root ball. Spray water on the roots before planting. This will greatly improve the chances of growth, no matter the conditions. Plant while taking care not to bury the plant's root collar. Form a basin around the plant's base, which will be used for watering the first months. Tamp the soil well around the roots (don't hesitate to use all of your weight). Water until the planting basin is full (at least two watering cans).

Prune my lilac

Prune your lilac after flowering when the flowers have wilted. Lightly pull back branches that have flowered as if the branches were intended for a bouquet of flowers. Give an elegant shape to the shrub by trying to lighten the interior if possible — making sure that light reaches the trunk. Eliminate the suckers that resprout from the plant.

Water my lilac

Needing little water, the lilac will mostly need to be watered when freshly planted in your garden and during its first summer. After, it will manage by itself. After planting your lilac, carry out generous watering infrequently to encourage the root system to seek water deep underground. It's therefore suitable to water until the planting basin is full and only empties slowly.

Mulch my lilac

Mulch the base of young trees the first year with wood chips or bark.

Fertilize my lilac

To encourage flowering, you can provide the lilac with slow decomposing organic fertilizer in spring. The other option, more permaculture, is to leave compost and dry leaves before winter at the base of your lilac.

Propagate my lilac

Some lilac varieties produce secondary shoots under the soil. Take advantage of them by removing them with their roots and replanting them elsewhere in the garden. In spring, choose a strong "sucker" in full growth. It is preferable to do this in spring to ensure a better recovery of the plant. Pull of the entire length of the sucker's root and cut it not far from the mother plant. For this, use a fork while taking care not to hurt the roots. Smear the cutting with wood ash to counter potential fungal diseases. Prune the sucker in order to leave only half the stem. This will prevent too much evaporation by the foliage and stimulate better root growth. Then replant the shoot in a deep enough pot that you will place in a sheltered and shady area. Water generously and take care not to ever let the substrate dry completely until the plant has recovered - which will be indicated by new growths. You will then replant the shoot directly in open soil, watering for several weeks to help recovery.

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