Lucky-heart

Who’s lucky?
Common name : Lucky-heart
Scientific name : Hoya kerrii
Family : Asclepiadaceae
Category : Indoor
Type of plant : Perennial
Indoor
Indoor
Hoya kerrii is a species of Hoya, popular as a houseplant for Saint Valentine's Day… for its thick heart-shaped leaves. A climbing plant - up to 4 meters! - often found in shops as a cutting: a simple (but pretty) heart-shaped leaf in a pot. Hoya kerrii grows above ground in a warm environnement, and feeds on the ambient humidity, though you might need to supplement this with light spraying or ponding. Above all, shelter them from direct sunlight in summer! A leaf-cutting - a heart-shaped leaf in a pot - can form buds with the right conditions ... after about 2 years.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance Low
Zone USDA 12a
Height 5 - 400
pH 6 - 7

Identify my lucky-heart

Hoya kerrii has waxy, inverted heart-shaped leaves and presents umbellate flowers on axillary peduncles in summer.

Plant my lucky-heart

Plant your hoya in a mix of potting soil, heathsoil and peat, indoors.

Water my lucky-heart

Hoya do not like excessive watering, nor limestone. To overcome the dryness of our interiors, prefer drenching the bottom of the pot only - to avoid soaking the roots - every 3-7 days. The rhythm changes to watering every 15 days during the winter. Use lukewarm rain water in the morning to allow the pot to dry during the day. Never wet the core of the plant.

Fertilize my lucky-heart

Between March and September, you can boost your hoya with a liquid fertilizer rich in potassium - long live the compost juice of banana peels! Put it in every 15 days.

Check on my lucky-heart

Watch out for red spiders, aphids and mealybugs! First, these famous red spiders! This is not a spider, but a mite. It absorbs the contents of the cells, and the leaves then become mottled (yellow-white-silver), thin canvases are sometimes observed. These mites mainly attack the back of the leaves. To check for their presence, soak a cotton pad with water and pass it under the leaves: you will notice tiny red spots. To get rid of them, know that these spiders hate water! Prepare a solution of black soap: 20g of soap, 1 liter of water and 30mL of spirit. For mealybugs, try baking soda (1 teaspoon in a quart of water, plus some soap!

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