Mango

Grow a mango !
Common name : Mango
Scientific name : Mangifera indica
Family : Anacardiaceae
Category : Fruit plants
Type of plant : Perennial
Cold-sensitive
Cold-sensitive
Sun loving
Sun loving
Edible
Edible
Mangifera indica - the mango tree - is a species of flowering plant in the sumac and poison ivy family Anacardiaceae, native to the Indian subcontinent. It is a large fruit-tree reaching a height of 100 feet or more in the right conditions, with large leathery leaves and small white flowers. Hundreds of cultivars have been introduced, notably for production in other warm regions of the world. Unfortunately, extended exposure to temperatures below _1°C (30°F) can kill or severely damage a mango tree - but in temperate climates then can be grown as houseplants.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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F
M
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J
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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 100 - 200
pH 6 - 7

Identify my mango

The leaves of the mango tree are oval and elongated, reddish when they are young, they take a dark green color as they age. They are quite hard and shiny, and have a smell reminiscent of turpentine. The bark is smooth, gray-brown in color, sometimes almost black, and slightly fissured. The mango tree is native to eastern India and Burma. It was introduced in the sixteenth century in Africa by the Arabs and in Brazil by the Portuguese, and is widely cultivated in all tropical countries since the seventeenth century. It fears the rains during its flowering (in winter) which impede fertilization: a dry season of two to three months favors the start of flowering. There are about 300 mango cultivars, some of which are present in Asia from 4000 to 5000 years ago. The ungrafted tree is sometimes called "mangotier". It produces smaller, more fibrous fruits.

Sow my mango

You will grow mango potted, except in a really mild climate. After eating a mango, wash the kernel under the tap. Then open it with a knife at its narrow end so that you can push a finger inside: it is through this opening that future growth will emerge. Inside: Plant the core in a moist mixture of peat, potting soil and some garden soil. The open side core of the should be flush with the top of the mixture. Cover the pot with a pane of glass or a clear plastic bag. To obtain a rapid germination, a temperature of about 25 ° with a good humidity will be necessary. The young shoots can appear after 3 weeks: then place your shoot in well-lit situation and water regularly but without excess. You can repot normally the following spring. Outside: Wait until temperatures exceed 25 ° C. Plant each seed in a mixture of potting soil and garden soil in a sunny, moist location. Cover the core with 5 cm, then water copiously. Mulch.

Dibble my mango

The mango has a powerful deep root: a very deep pot, like a pot for roses, very wide, will be necessary for its cultivation. Drain the bottom of the pot with clay balls to prevent stagnation of water in the roots, then fill the pot with a very rich mixture of good potting soilt, compost and crushed horn powder, before transplanting your young plant.

Plant my mango

The mango tree generally prefers deep sandy-loam soils, which are cool but well drained - a soil that is often wet can be deadly to it - and it is more fruitful in semi-arid areas - it requires 2 to 3 months of dry season! Given its low hardiness - between 4 and 10 ° C minimum - it should be grown in pots in most temperate regions. Plant it in the spring, in a large, deep pot. Fill it with a draining soil. Place the pot on a saucer filled with damp gravel to maintain high air moisture.

Repot my mango

A mango tree grown in pots needs regular inputs otherwise it risks of not being at its best! Repot in the spring, every 2 to 3 years, changing medium for a good potting soil. Make sure the pot is large and deep enough, and the bottom of the pot is well drilled - add some pebbles to the bottom for a draining effect. If you do not want to repot, you can scrape the soil and add new substrate on the first centimeters, without changing the pot.

Water my mango

Keep the mixture moist at all times by generous waterings in the summer. However, do not soak it and think about emptying the saucer. The young plant will also be sensitive to the drying of the mixture. In winter, consider reducing watering but do not let the mixture dry out completely. The plant at rest always needs moisture, but must feel a clear difference between the abundance of inputs in summer and the moderate ones in winter. During flowering - if you see a bud you are in luck! - some "water stress" - the lack of water! - may allow better flowering.

Shelter my mango

Starting in autumn, bring in the pots. Have your potted mango tree spend winter in a bright frost-free spot: the ideal temperature is between 8 and 12°C - definitely not in your living room or else resign yourself to living in these temperatures. During winter, keep watering your tree as long as it is still bearing fruit, then you can space out the watering, letting the substrate dry slightly between them.

Put outside my mango

Take out your potted mango tree for the summer, starting in late spring. Avoid full sun, especially the first days!

Protect my mango

If your mango tree is in open soil and you fear a possible frost, do not hesitate to cover the roots with a good pile of dead leaves for the roughest weeks. Also surround the trunk with a thick doormat (braided rush, reed, rye straw or rice ...), maintained by links. You can also cover the foliage with a garden cover!

Fertilize my mango

The mango's love of water accelerates soil leaching: therefore, it really must be fertilized — especially for potted lemons! For a plentiful harvest, regularly provide a fertilizer rich in nitrogen and lye — you can find fertilizers appropriate for citrus fruit in stores or try with a compost. In winter, reduce the provisions to once a month. In spring, start back up with a frequency of once every two weeks.

Prune my mango

You can prune your mango tree, mainly to give it a shape or to remove weak branches: it supports very well the pruning! But it's not mandatory at all ...

Check on my mango

Observe your mango tree in winter: if leaves turn black, it's a cold snap, and if they turn pale, it's a lack of fertilizer! The mango can also have other troubles: the aphids can be seen with the naked eye, under the leaves, near the veins. Spray on the leaves some soapy water, or a mixture of water and olive oil that will nourish your plant. Mealybugs lock themselves in a brown carapace or under a white felting, on the back of the leaf against the main vein and secrete a honeydew that will eventually attract mushrooms. Against mealybugs, you can moisten the foliage preventively by spraying it several times a week with non-calcareous and non-chlorinated water.

Mulch my mango

Native to tropical regions where the rainfall reaches up to 2,000 mm / year, the mango tree likes a soil always fresh but well drained. Add mulch around it to keep it cool! Decomposed compost, or grass clippings suit him very well.

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