Marigold

Tagetes patula, or marigolds, originally come from Latin America and will bloom in your garden all summer!
Common name : Marigold
Scientific name : Tagetes patula
Family : Asteraceae
Category : Annual
Easy peasy
Easy peasy
Sun loving
Sun loving
Flowery
Flowery
Small pots
Small pots
As a very floriferous annual, there are many varieties including dwarfs, or those much larger! The foliage doesn't have a great smell, but it is easy to grow. It's a dye plant that can also be used as green fertilizer.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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F
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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 8a
Height 20 - 90
pH 6 - 7

Identify my marigold

The marigold — or Tagetes — is actually from Latin American, not India, and has multiple varieties. It's an annual with a lot of impact, thanks to the size and vivid colors of the flowers. Marigolds can be used to fight again a good number of insects, including aphids and whiteflies — their strong scent is a natural repellant for garden parasites. Don't confuse it with Chinese dianthus or Sweet William dianthus!

Sow my marigold

Sow marigolds under shelter starting in February-March. Fill a seed tray with a mixture of potting soil and river sand, then tamp the top soil flat with your hands. Marigold seeds are long and easy to hand — take advantage of this to space them out properly! Cover each seed delicately with a few millimeters of soil mix. Finish by water with a fine mist to completely wet the soil.

Repot my marigold

Transplant seedlings sown inside during April in pots: you can put them in open soil after the last frost!

Dibble my marigold

Transplant indoor seedlings during April into small pots — you can plant these once the last frost has passed!

Plant my marigold

Plant small, potted marigolds starting in April-May in ordinary soil enriched with a bit of potting soil, in the sun. You can plant them in the middle of your vegetable garden to fight roundworms, or near tomatoes or rose bushes to fight aphids!

Check on my marigold

Snails and slugs love marigolds, so wait until your plants are sufficiently large to plant them in open soil, and use beer or flour traps to attract the pests.

Prune my marigold

Get rid of wilted leaves as needed in order to stimulate new flower growth and to avoid stressing the plant.

Water my marigold

Water your marigolds regularly for the first few weeks after sowing or transplanting, in case of prolonged dryness, or if the soil is noticeably dry in a pot. Don't water excessively as this may cause the roots to rot.

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