Marigold

Did you know? Pot marigold florets are edible! Add color to salads with them !
Common name : Marigold
Scientific name : Calendula officinalis
Family : Asteraceae
Category : Annual
Easy peasy
Easy peasy
Calendula officinalis - the pot marigold, ruddles, common marigold - is a plant in the genus Calendula of the family Asteraceae, native to southern Europe, widely naturalized further north in Europe and elsewhere in warm temperate regions of the world. The Latin specific epithet officinalis refers to the plant’s medical and herbal uses. It is a short-lived aromatic herbaceous perennial, growing to 80 cm (31 in) tall, with sparsely branched lax or erect stems. The leaves are oblong-lanceolate, 5–17 cm (2–7 in) long, hairy on both sides, and with margins entire or occasionally waved or weakly toothed. The inflorescences are yellow and may appear all year long where conditions are suitable. Calendula officinalis is widely cultivated and can be grown easily in sunny locations in most kinds of soils. Although perennial, it is commonly treated as an annual, particularly in colder regions where its winter survival is poor and in hot summer locations where it also does not survive. Numerous cultivars have been selected for variation in the flowers, from pale yellow to orange-red, and with 'double' flowerheads with ray florets replacing some or all of the disc florets.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_3
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 50 - 70
pH 6 - 7

Identify my marigold

Marigold - Calendula - is a genus of about 20 species of annual or perennial herbaceous plants of the Asteraceae family, native to the Mediterranean region. It is usually between 5 and 50 cm high. It is a short-lived perennial herb, often grown as annual, with yellow or orange-yellow flowers, blooming in the early days of spring, and can last almost year-round.

Sow my marigold

From the middle of March for mild climates and from April in the more northern regions, choose a sunny place - not scorching - for your marigolds. As for asters, an ordinary garden soil mixed with potting soil is ideal. Avoid soils that are too heavy and too compact that keep moisture to the detriment of the cosmos. To make a beautiful groundcover, plan a dozen feet per square meter. You can totally sow marigolds in bins - rather in large containers than in small pots.

Thin out my marigold

Once your seeds have emerged, you can thin out your plantlings. This consists in removing the most fragile and too crowded plants. Keep a dozen plants per square meter - well distributed!

Mulch my marigold

Mulch between plants, one to two weeks after transplanting, using dried leaves or crushed wood (or any other mulch that retains moisture). This will limit evaporation at ground level, and therefore the need for watering and weeding.

Remove my marigold

If you really have too much trouble, you can let off steam by tearing them off! Anyway, after the bloom they will dry, so you will have to pull them out, especially if you do not want them to make seeds. For plants with superficial rooting, just shoot them. Otherwise help yourself with a spade to loosen up the earth around.

Water my marigold

Water the seedlings and the young plants with a fine mist to avoid uprooting them accidentally, and take care not to drown them. Once developed, your plants will put up with weekly waterings (morning or night) from a hose or watering can, or even a nice big cloud!

Propagate my marigold

The calendulas multiply mainly by sowing, so consider harvesting the seeds in late summer, and sow them from March. Spontaneous seedlings are not so rare and sometimes flowers that have disappeared during the winter reappear.

Groww, the plant identification and gardening app