Mexican orange ‘Sundance’

A Mexican cultivar with a golden foliage.
Common name : Mexican orange ‘Sundance’
Scientific name : Choisya ternata 'Sundance'
Family : Caprifoliaceae
Category : Shrubs
Type of plant : Perennial
Full description for Choisya ternata 'Sundance' not yet available.

Sowing & planting

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F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

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F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 8a
Height 100 - 200
pH 6 - 7

Identify my mexican orange ‘sundance’

This small, compact shrub that flowers magnificently, Choisya ternata, also called the Mexican orange tree, originate from the country where it takes it's name. {ut1)Fairly common for us, the "Aztec Pearl" varierty was hybridized in 1982 by crossing Choisya ternata and Choisya dumosa. Arizonica which.

Plant my mexican orange ‘sundance’

Plant in spring to give you Mexican orange tree time to settle. Find it a nice, sunny place to stay with light, well-drained soil, and shelter from the wind of course! Give it a good dose of good compost, possibly even a rich manure — we tend to think that the Mexican orange tree grows in poor soil, but at our latitude it'll grow much less quickly without help from you! Plant in a hole at least two times bigger than the root ball. Spray water on the roots before planting. This will greatly improve the chances of growth, no matter the conditions. You can create a basin around the plant, which will be used for watering the first months. Tamp the soil well around the roots (don't hesitate to use all of your weight). Water generously, completely filling the basin.

Mulch my mexican orange ‘sundance’

Mulch, for example with compost, especially the first year after planting.

Water my mexican orange ‘sundance’

Water regularly and generously for several weeks after planting. After, you only have to worry about watering if your Mexican orange tree is potted. Outside of these conditions, the Mexican orange tree manages on its own, even handling dry soil better than moist soil.

Repot my mexican orange ‘sundance’

If you keep your Mexican orange tree potted, be prepared to repot it every 2 to 3 years in simple fertile soil and a slightly bigger pot.

Fertilize my mexican orange ‘sundance’

The Mexican orange tree grows in relatively poor soil in it's natural environment. In the garden, it will still need a bit of help from you to flower well and resist the cold, especially while it's young. Adding potassium, which helps flowering, will be a great help. In summer, give it a rapid absorption fertilizer. A complete organic fertilizer, with low nitrogen content (often fertilizers for tomatoes) will do it good. You may also use charcoal, naturally rich in potassium.

Prune my mexican orange ‘sundance’

Choisya ternata doesn't need to be pruned, strictly speaking — but you might want to keep it's dome shape or balance it's sihouette. In this case, prune lightly, after flowering.

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