Morning glory

A twining climbing plant with amazing blue flowers.
Common name : Morning glory
Scientific name : Ipomoea spp.
Family : Convolvulaceae
Category : Climbing plants
Type of plant : Annual
Ipomoea is the largest genus in the flowering plant family Convolvulaceae, with over 500 species. It shares its common name with a few other species in related genera. They are annual and perennial twining climbing plants, with spectacular, colorful flowers.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Harvestint

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_3
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 200 - 600
pH 6 - 7

Identify my morning glory

Ipomoeae are voluble climbers forming a vast genus of about 500 species. Among them are the sweet potato Ipomoea (Ipomoea batatas), the Ipomoea tricolor, the ivy leaf Ipomea (Ipomoea hederifolia), the volubilis (Ipomoea purpurea) or the red-flowered Ipomea (Ipomoea coccinea) ). Native to North and South America, these vigorous plants grow quickly and can climb very high. The Ipomea has a light port, trilobate leaves, thin stems and flowers pentagon-shaped, whose many colors delight the Mediterranean gardens. Perennial plant in the tropics, the ipomée does not support frost and is grown as an annual in Northern Europe.

Sow my morning glory

Outside: It can be sown directly in the ground from mid-May but the flowering will take place much later. Wait in any case for the earth to warm up sufficiently - if the nights are still cool (less than 10 ° C) it's still too early! Sow in pits: dig each hole a hole 15 cm deep, fill with potting soil, seize three seeds by pressing 3 cm and water. Inside: To obtain vigorous plants, which will climb quickly and will be covered with flowers, sow under shelter from March. Soak the seeds in lukewarm water for 1 hour before sowing to accelerate emergence. The sowing is done in pits, by depositing 2 or 3 seeds in a small hole of 3 cm/1 inch deep, practiced in earth with the help of a pencil or a small stick.

Thin out my morning glory

Once the seedling have emerged, you should thin it out. Keep one plant per spot.

Dibble my morning glory

After the frosts, you can plant the morning glories in open soil or in a deep tray. In open soil it will enjoy full sun and a rich and well-drained soil Prepare the soil by breaking it down with a fork, weeding, and then plant with the help of a transplanter. Mulch copiously around your plantations to slow down the emergence of plants that could become competitors. In pots, plant in an enriched soil, possibly with decomposed manure. If you want to harvest beautiful tubers, choose a deep container of at least 30 cm.

Mulch my morning glory

Mulch between the plants a week or two after transplanting, using dried leaves or wood chips (or any other moisture-conserving mulch). This will limit evaporation from the soil, and thus the need to water and to weed.

Plant my morning glory

Plant your morning glory after the last frosts! In the ground it will enjoy the full sun and a rich and well drained earth, in pot, plant in a soil enriched possibly decomposed manure.

Water my morning glory

Water seedlings in fine mist, maintaining the soil always moist - if in a pot make sure you use drainage pots. After a few weeks, watering once a week should be fine.

Propagate my morning glory

The ipomea is multiplied mainly by sowing, and will even tend to do it by itself without restraint! Remember to harvest the seeds in late summer. You can sow them in March.

Reap my morning glory

Did you know? The sweet potato is the tuber of some species of Ipomoea -Ipomoea batatas and its cultivars such as 'Sweet Caroline'. If you have sown this species, know that in September-October, your Ipomoea will have grown beautiful tubers that you can harvest like potatoes.

Remove my morning glory

If your morning glories are not edible tear them out at the end of the season. The morning glory, cousin of the bindweed is vigorous, and tends to produce seeds easily. In the fall, it will spread around it many seeds which can be a little invasive! To avoid it, you can pull it out before the seeds dry, taking care not to drop pods.

Check on my morning glory

Ipomea is a particularly resistant plant and it does not fear predators. If the aphids start to invade, let them do it! Ah ah! It will withstand their predation very well and during this time, they will leave your other plants in peace!

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