New England aster

A large aster blooming in Autumn.
Common name : New England aster
Scientific name : Symphyotrichum novae-angliae
Family : Asteraceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Easy peasy
Easy peasy
Flowery
Flowery
Large pot
Large pot
Full description for Symphyotrichum novae-angliae not yet available.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 5a
Height 30 - 150
pH 7 - 8

Identify my new england aster

Aster - from the Greek "star", by analogy with the shape of the flower - is a genus of dicotyledonous plants of the family of Asteraceae, very important by the number of species and varieties: more than 600!

Plant my new england aster

Most asters bloom in autumn, and are also planted in autumn. If you have one of the few species that bloom in the spring, plant them in the spring. Choose a sunny place or semi shade - to ensure a beautiful bloom! - and not much wet, these asters dread stagnant water. Prepare the soil with a little digging, scratching and raking. Plant perennials at a distance of 1/2 of adult height between plants (check spacing precisely on the label or in the literature depending on the cultivar, if you can). Thoroughly tamp the soil to not let air voids in contact with the roots. Water abundantly.

Prop my new england aster

Train any asters taller than 80 cm in March, otherwise they may droop and sag after rain. A stake and a wire should do the job.

Mulch my new england aster

Mulching these perennials will save you from watering and weeding and will even fertilize the soil a bit as it decomposes. When choosing, know that dry wood chips are the most inert, but they will last for a longer time. Fresh wood chips and leaves enrich the soil but must be changed often. Grass cuttings are to be used mixed with something else in a layer that is at most 1 cm thick. Mulch with a thickness of at least 5 cm to provide a good level of efficiency.

Water my new england aster

Asters do not particularly fear drought. Water grownup plants until the water that you pour does not rush into the ground, and forms a small puddleto their fill, even if it is less frequent. Unless otherwise specified, do not wet the foliage: the plants "drink" by their roots. Seedlings should be watered in fine rain. Keep them permanently moist to get germination.

Weed my new england aster

In perennial species, weeding also means working your flowerbed – don't let anything develop too quickly to the detriment of others.

Cut down my new england aster

Cut the asters a few inches off the ground in November, before mulching them.

Fertilize my new england aster

With a respectful approach to soil life, it's always better to fertilize a little in advance with organic material that will decompose; spread out a compost that isn't entirely decomposed, with well decomposed manure at the plant's base, and incorporate over 10 cm with a hoe. This operation is carried out in winter so that earthworms and bacteria have enough time to do their job.

Propagate my new england aster

Harvest the seeds if you'd like to propagate your plants! Multiply them by seeding in a pot under a cold frame in autumn or spring, after removing the caustic external flesh of the berries, then transplanting them in open soil after the last freeze.

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