Passionflower

Passion fruit in your garden or on your balcony!
Common name : Passionflower
Scientific name : Passiflora spp.
Family : Passifloraceae
Category : Climbing plants
Type of plant : Perennial
This description concerns Passiflora caerulea, a relatively hardy species of passionflower, well-suited to milder temperate areas. With a little protection, you can continuously grow it from one year to the next! The blue passionflower forms a rigid vine that can reach up to 5 meters in height, by clinging to and climbing up walls or other structures with the help of its tendrils. Its leaves are evergreen, weather permitting, and if certain parts of it freeze, it is often self-sufficient enough to make a fresh start. Its stunning flowers bloom throughout the summer and well into the autumn months.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 7a
Height 200 - 500
pH 6 - 7

Identify my passionflower

Passiflora is a genus of climbing plants with more than 530 species — blue passionflower (Passiflora caerulea) is the most cultivated ornamental passionflower in metropolitan France, recognizable for it's distinct and uniquely shaped flowers!

Plant my passionflower

Blue passionflower is content with average, but adequately light, soil. Add a bit of sand during planting if it seems too heavy. It will accept partial shade, but take into consideration the fact that it won't enjoy winter air currents — if they temperatures fall harshly where you live, give your plant a choice, sunny spot to stay! Plant in spring or autumn, always outside of freezing periods. Install the root ball approximately 20 cm away from it's future support.

Mulch my passionflower

In open soil, blue passionflower will resist temperature below zero fairly well — down to -8°C. It's worth protecting the plant anyways — mulch, especially at the beginning of winter, to protect the base of your passionflower from the biting cold. A nice layer of compost will do the job!

Water my passionflower

Water generously and often in spring and in summer for the first year, a little less the second, and then mostly during high heat periods and that is all: outside of particular conditions, your passionflower will manage very well on its own (rainwater is gentle which is perfect!) Outside of these specific conditions, your passionflower will appreciate fairly dry soil and get by very well alone unless it's in a pot — in this case, watch it and water every week in the summer. One thing: you can provide small basins at the base and then spread out a 10 cm thick layer of mulch.

Fertilize my passionflower

Fertilize the roots in the summer, particularly the first few years, with a good bed of compost. Adding potassium in the form of wood ash or chopped up banana peels will delight your plant!

Repot my passionflower

Even in a large pot, at the end of a few years, your passionflower will have exhausted all the richness of it's substate, and even fertilizer additions won't be enough. Repot every 3 years, in autumn, before placing it in shelter after a severe pruning. Scrape the root ball lightly to knock off old substrate. Choose a pot that is at least a few centimers larger than the previous.

Protect my passionflower

If your passionflower is in a pot, it needs to be protected! You may covering it with a winter wrap or simply wrap the pot itself in thick cloth. If it's possible to bring the plant inside, do so, but be careful — you'll have to prepare a fairly chilly room for it to simulate the period of winter rest. To clarify, it's chances of survival are greater if outdoors and protected than in an overheated interior location!

Prune my passionflower

The development of the passionflower is fairly quick — prune the plant after flowering in order to limit the vegetation and stimilate the next flowering. The more your prune, the more your plant will flower and thicken!

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