Peach-leaved bellflower

An abundant blooming of bell-shaped flowers!
Common name : Peach-leaved bellflower
Scientific name : Campanula persicifolia
Family : Campanulaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Easy peasy
Easy peasy
Urban
Urban
Flowery
Flowery
Small pots
Small pots
Campanula persicifolia - the peach-leaved bellflower - is a species in the family Campanulaceae native to the Alps in Europe. It is a clump-forming herbaceous perennial growing to 1 m (3 ft 3 in) with an unbranched, erect stem, short stalked basal leaves and upper leaves unstalked, lanceolate, and cup-shaped lilac-blue or white bell-shaped flowers. Numerous varieties and cultivars have been developed in a range of colours including white, blue, pink and purple.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_3
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 5a
Height 30 - 80
pH 6 - 7

Identify my peach-leaved bellflower

Here is Campanula persicifolia, or peached-leaves bellflower. Its flowers often white and blue form open sections, frankly different from those tubulated of Campanula portenschlagiana. Flowering lasts from June to July but starts again frequently at the end of August if you take care to remove the faded flowers. The leaves of Campanula persicifolia, shiny green, are quite leathery and oblong or very elongated. They form dense rosettes from which the floral stems emerge in spring. These rosettes generally thin out when the flower stalk develops.

Plant my peach-leaved bellflower

Bellflowers support a dry and well drained soil, and do not appreciate limestone: enrich the earth with potting soil. Dip the clumps in a tray filled with water to moisten them well. Plant them when the water is no longer flowing out of the bucket. Prepare the soil: dig holes, with a spacing of 20 to 30 cm, and mix the soil with potting soil, sand and peat dust. Put the plants in there. Cover with soil by tamping gently to avoid air around the roots, then water.

Weed my peach-leaved bellflower

In perennial species, weeding also means working your flowerbed – don't let anything develop too quickly to the detriment of others.

Water my peach-leaved bellflower

Water during the summer season but with care: bellflowers do not appreciate neither drought or excessive humidity. Check the moisture of the plants the first month after planting or potting, and water in pots once a week if it is very dry, rather in the morning. Remember to keep the leaves dry !

Fertilize my peach-leaved bellflower

With a respectful approach to soil life, it's always better to fertilize a little in advance with organic material that will decompose; spread out a compost that isn't entirely decomposed, with well decomposed manure at the plant's base, and incorporate over 10 cm with a hoe. This operation is carried out in winter so that earthworms and bacteria have enough time to do their job.

Propagate my peach-leaved bellflower

Harvesting your own seeds before sowing is a good way to multiply, because this plant can be seeded with extreme ease! Be careful if you have blue and white plants, not to mix them! In this case, you can divide the tuft in autumn. Choose old plants, which do not bloom much anymore. Dig them up with a pitchfork, take care not to damage the roots. Push the fork in the center of the tuft to divide it, without hesitation. Transplant immediatly.

Mulch my peach-leaved bellflower

Mulch campanula's base, it will prevent you from watering and weeding in summer, and - even if they are rather hardy it will protect the roots of the cold in winter.

Prune my peach-leaved bellflower

By pruning flower stalks in July, after flowering, you can expect a second flowering, smaller, late August!

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