Periwinkle

An easy ground cover.
Common name : Periwinkle
Scientific name : Vinca spp.
Family : Apocynaceae
Category : Perennials
Type of plant : Perennial
Evergreen
Evergreen
Flowery
Flowery
Invader
Invader
Vinca is a genus of flowering plants in the family Apocynaceae native to Europe, northwest Africa and southwest Asia. It shares its common name with the related genus Catharanthus. Two of the species, Vinca major and Vinca minor, are extensively cultivated as a flowering evergreen ornamental plant. Because the plants are low and spread quickly, they are often used as groundcover. Many cultivars are available, with different plant, leaf, and flower - colors, sizes, and habits. Species of the genus are 20–70 cm (8–27.5 in) subshrubs or herbaceous, with opposite, lanceolate to ovate, 1–9 cm (0.5–3.5 in) long leaves and salverform - like those of Phlox - flowers. Vinca may be invasive in some regions, including parts of Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States, especially coastal California.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance High
Zone USDA 6a
Height 30 - 45
pH 6 - 7

Identify my periwinkle

Periwinkles are ground covers, sub-shrubs and herbaceous perennials. Their leaves are persistent, shiny, opposite, lanceolate, elliptical or ovate, often variegated. The flowers have long petioles and five lobes.

Plant my periwinkle

Plant your periwinkle in the sun or possibly in partial shade from February to April and from September to November. In the sun, the periwinkles need a cool soil to produce an abundant flowering. Remember: periwinkles are ground covers, so plan to keep some space around for their future expansion. Tamp the soil to avoid having air around the roots, then water thoroughly.

Water my periwinkle

During growth, water once or twice a week. In case of drought in summer, to prevent yellowing of foliage, water abundantly twice a week. In pots, water from April to October twice a week.

Weed my periwinkle

In the case of periwinkles, after a few years it may be necessary to limit their development, otherwise you risk losing neighboring plants. Pull off the outer rods as needed.

Fertilize my periwinkle

Generally, periwinkles are not very demanding in fertilizing, they are content with what is available. However if your soil is very poor and stony, a supply of organic matter-mulching in November can greatly help the first years.

Propagate my periwinkle

Very easy: between April and June, cut with a spade a part of the root ball, and replant it in a new location.

Mulch my periwinkle

Mulching the perennial plants will save you from watering and weeding and will even fertilize the soil a bit as it decomposes. When choosing, know that dry wood chips are the most inert, but they will last for a longer time. Fresh wood chips and leaves enrich the soil but must be changed often. Grass cuttings are to be used mixed with something else in a layer that is at most 1 cm thick. Mulch with at least 5 cm of thickness to ensure it works and isn't simply a cosmetic effect.

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