Red Kuri Squash

Red kuri squash has nothing but plus sides: a snap to grow, tasty, and easy to store. If your garden is big enough, go for it!
Common name : Red Kuri Squash
Scientific name : Cucurbita maxima Potimarron
Family : Cucurbitaceae
Category : Veggies
Type of plant : Annual
Easy peasy
Easy peasy
Edible
Edible
Red kuri squash thrives in rich, well-drained soil, and direct sunlight. They can be harvested from September to November. It can be planted in spring, or transplanted as a young seedling purchased commercially at the beginning of summer. Planting should be done in warm temperature - therefore, early seeding should be done under shelter, starting in March, keeping in mind that planting seedlings in open soil happens 25 days later once the frost has lifted. No need to anticipate too much.

Sowing & planting

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F
M
A
M
J
J
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S
O
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D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Harvestint

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 10a
Height 50 - 60
pH 7

Identify my red kuri squash

Special advice from the Groww team — when you're about to sow your red kuri squash, take the seed packet and turn it into a label. Since most young gourds look alike, you'd otherwise have to wait for the first flowers, or even fruits (which by the way, hybridize easily with other gourds in your garden...) in order to be sure about the species. Butternut squash forms stems running along the ground which cover about 2 m2, the flowers are yellow, like those of courgettes, and the leaves are heart-shaped, rough, and green with shallow lobes.

Sow my red kuri squash

You can sow in open soil starting at the end of April, once the risk of frost has passed in your region, until the end of summer. Sow in seed holes (3 seeds in the same hole) 2 to 3 centimeters deep and keeping 100 cm between each seed hole. Water carefully, even spraying the substrate until sprouting. For inside seedlings, you can sow under shelter from March, avoiding the direct sun. You will avoid the stress of chasing slugs! Sow in pans, 3 seeds per pot, on a bed of gravel or clay balls to ease drainage and prevent the roots from rotting. Add special potting soil up to 2/3 of the height of the container and tamp lightly. Then fill to top. Sow at 2-3 centimeters deep. Water gently.

Prune my red kuri squash

You can eventually prune the plants in order to maximize production. When the plant has produced five leaves per stem, pinch them off, leaving only two leaves on each stem. Once each stem has ten leaves, repeat, leaving cinq leaves on each stem. To finish, once the fruits have grown to a diameter of 5cm, pinch off all but two leaves about the fruit.

Plant my red kuri squash

Starting in May, if there is no longer a chance of frost, and 3 weeks have passed after sowing under shelter, plant your squash in loose, cool, and rich soil in the sun (you can add fresh compost to the planting hole). Careful: squash needs to be pollinated in order to bear fruits. It is therefore necessary to have several plants — male and female! - to encourage the crop. Leave a space of about 2 square meters for a each plant. Water generously after planting and the following two weeks.

Mulch my red kuri squash

Mulch between the plants one to two weeks after the final planting, using a natural mulch which holds in moisture. This will limit evaporation from the soil, and thus the need to water and to weed.

Water my red kuri squash

Water the seedlings and new plantings two times a week without wetting the foliage! During the summer, watch out for signs of dryness, particularly leaves leaning towards the ground. Water generously, 2 or 3 times a week, and once less if you mulch, more if drought occurs. Water the base twice daily without wetting the foliage to prevent powdery mildew.

Weed my red kuri squash

Weed regularly during the entire growth period, removing and renewing the mulch from time to time.

Reap my red kuri squash

The harvest takes place in autumn, when the fruit takes on an orange hue, the skin hardens and the stalk becomes very dry. The fruits hate moisture from the ground — place a layer of dry straw mulch underneath them.

Check on my red kuri squash

Watch for slugs which can devour the young plant in just one night. These pests can easily be diverted from your precious vegetables by an offering of beer or flour placed away from your crops (get the cheapest, they aren't very difficult to satisfy).

Remove my red kuri squash

Once the last fruit is harvested, don't forget to pull out the plants to make room for autumn planting! Correctly remove the roots and avoid composting the remains if the foliage shows signs of disease.

Dibble my red kuri squash

Starting in the beginning of May, once there's no more risk of freezing and 3 weeks after sowing if you sown under shelter, transplant in open soil - rich and deep and sunny. Make sure each plant has enough room - 2 square meters for each, water thoroughly after transplanting.

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