Rocktrumpet

A spectacular vine.
Common name : Rocktrumpet
Scientific name : Mandevilla sanderi
Family : Apocynaceae
Category : Climbing plants
Type of plant : Perennial
Cold-sensitive
Cold-sensitive
Sun loving
Sun loving
Flowery
Flowery
Mandevilla - the rocktrumpet - is a tropical or subtropical flowering vine native to the Southwestern United States, Central and South America, with spectacular fragrant flowers in a variety of colours.

Sowing & planting

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Flowering

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F
M
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M
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J
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S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_4
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 40 - 1000
pH 6

Identify my rocktrumpet

Mandevilla is a genus of tropical or subtropical perennial plants of the family Apocynaceae, native to South America, some of which are grown as ornamental plants for their flowers. These species are called "dipladenias" by the name of a genus, Dipladenia, now considered synonymous with Mandevilla. They are small climbing plants with flowers forming vines of 2 m, with slender and twining stems. They bear leathery leaves, veined with a brilliant green. The flowering period goes from March to November and gives flowers of various colors: white, red, yellow, pink! There are a hundred species and many hybrids.

Plant my rocktrumpet

In open soil or in pot? It's simple, if at home the temperature drops permanently below 8-10 ° C, it will be in pot! It is easily found in shops in the spring, in pots often of already substantial size. Do not leave your dipladenia in the original pot, often plastic (unsightly, heated by the rays of the sun, waterproof ... An horror!) But repot it in a slightly larger pot - terracotta! Plant in the spring in a sheltered and sunny place. The dipladenia likes rich and well-drained soil because it dreads when its roots stagnate in the water. In the open soil, choose a slightly sunny location, even in the semi shade. Water copiously to facilitate rooting.

Water my rocktrumpet

Dipladenia withstands periods of drought thanks to its fleshy roots that store water, but it doesn't appreciate the excess of water, which make its roots rot. Do not install dishes under your pots or otherwise never forget emptying them after watering! In pots indoors, in winter, watering once a month should suffice. In warm weather, water regularly, if possible with non-calcareous water to keep the soil slightly damp. In the ground, waterings should be moderate, except in case of intense drought.

Prune my rocktrumpet

The pruning of the dipladenia is not really essential, it is even discouraged when it is too severe! However, you may need to balance the branches to prevent your shrub from becoming deformed. Avoid cutting the whole plant, but proceed slowly, season after season. Trim at the end of winter, after all risk of frost. Wear gloves! If you want your dipladenia to cover with buds all season, you will need to spend 2-3 times a week a few moments to remove faded flowers, between the thumb and forefinger or with a pruner. Courage!

Protect my rocktrumpet

Your mandevilla is very fragile - it would not survive a frost episode! If your plant is outside and you dread a very cold period, mulch the base and protect your plant with a veil for wintering.

Shelter my rocktrumpet

If your plant is in a pot and you have a sheltered place, remaining at a minimum temperature of 10 ° C, sufficiently lighted, bring it inside for wintering, as soon as the temperatures fall. Water very little during the winter. It may lose its leaves because, like most plants, it does not like to change places. You can take it out again in May.

Put outside my rocktrumpet

When the temperatures exceed 12 ° C, get out your potted mandevilla: find it a sheltered, sunny spot!

Fertilize my rocktrumpet

You can bring, if necessary, before and during flowering, a liquid fertilizer for flowering plants to stimulate flowering. Ashes of wood, as a potassium intake, can also do the trick! In any case reduce the amount of fertilizer at the end of the summer and stop completely in early autumn.

Spray my rocktrumpet

Indoors, especially if it stays there all year, the Dipladenia needs regular fogging of the foliage with non-calcareous water to sustain the humidity it needs. If the leaves turn brown and eventually curl, it is certainly an attack of aphids. If the leaves turn yellow rather suddenly, it is certainly an attack of mealybugs: in both cases, a spraying of water added with baking soda and a little soap can get rid of it.

Repot my rocktrumpet

Repot every year, to adapt the container if necessary, and especially to change the substrate. Renew as much soil as possible, bringing potting soil and sand for a good drainage.

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