Venus flytrap

Keep your fingers off it, will you?
Common name : Venus flytrap
Scientific name : Dionaea muscipula
Family : Droseraceae
Category : Indoor
Type of plant : Perennial
Cold-sensitive
Cold-sensitive
Minimal water
Minimal water
Urban
Urban
Indoor
Indoor
Small pots
Small pots
Dionaea muscipula - the Venus flytrap - is a carnivorous plant native to subtropical wetlands in North Carolina and South Carolina in the United States. It has variations in petiole shape and length and whether the leaf lies flat on the ground or extends up at an angle of about 40–60 degrees. The four major forms are: 'typica', the most common, with broad decumbent petioles - 'erecta', with leaves at a 45-degree angle - 'linearis', with narrow petioles and leaves at 45 degrees - and 'filiformis', with extremely narrow or linear petioles. Venus flytraps are by far the most commonly cultivated carnivorous plant, and they are frequently sold as houseplants. Various cultivars (cultivated varieties) have come into the market through tissue culture of selected genetic mutations, and these plants are raised in large quantities for commercial markets. An important note to the gardener : flytraps must receive a 30-60 day chilling period once a year in order to trigger normal growth in the Spring.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_2
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 15 - 45
pH 6 - 7

Identify my venus flytrap

There is only one species of Dioneae, Dionaea muscipula. The leaves of the dionea are rounded, equipped with hairy stiff spines that trigger the closure of the leaf.

Plant my venus flytrap

Native to South Carolina, the Dionea is mostly cultivated under shelter - it needs more than 5 ° C to grow. Plant it in a mixture of peat and non-calcareous sand. You will have to find a place with a dim light, and a moderate pot. To plant in open soil - if you are in a mild climate - plant in acid soil, rather cool, in full sun, every 20 cm.

Water my venus flytrap

Dioneas do not support limestone, so water them with rainwater or distilled water. The soil should always remain moist during the growing season, from March to October, so water frequently.

Spray my venus flytrap

In dry weather, spray your plant with water not too hard, clean the dust on the leaves once every two weeks.

Take care of my venus flytrap

To stimulate the formation of traps, regularly prune the emerging flower stalks and dead leaves.

Repot my venus flytrap

At the end of winter every year, transplant your plant in a pot slightly larger than the current, with a mixture of peat and sand in equal parts.

Check on my venus flytrap

It is normal that some leaves darken, it is their process of renewal. However, if the majority of the plant begins to darken, it is because its roots receive too much moisture and a mushroom develops there. It is then necessary to repot your dionea in a mixture of peat and healthy sand. Some gardeners advise to soak it in a fungicide during the operation; it's up to you to see if you support chemical solutions.

Put outside my venus flytrap

Put them out for summer - in full sun ... And water them often!

Shelter my venus flytrap

You must get your venus flytrap inside before the winter! Bring it in a room protected from freezing, ideally around 15 ° C. Start reducing watering gradually until the vegetation stops. With a small pruner for indoor plants or a pair of scissors, cut all the leaves as they die. Leave the plant in its pot and place it in an even cooler room, between 5 and 10 ° C. If you do not have enough cold room to keep your rhizomes, you can put them in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. The temperature - between 5 and 10 ° - suits them.

Groww, the plant identification and gardening app