Welsh Onion

Easy to grow, and wonderful for Asian cooking !
Common name : Welsh Onion
Scientific name : Allium fistulosum
Family : Alliaceae
Category : Veggies
Type of plant : Perennial
Easy peasy
Easy peasy
Sun loving
Sun loving
Edible
Edible
Urban
Urban
Allium fistulosum, the Welsh onion, also commonly called bunching onion, long green onion, Japanese bunching onion, scallion, and spring onion, is a species of perennial plant. It is very similar in taste and odor to the related common onion, Allium cepa. The common name "Welsh onion" does not refer to Wales but derives from a near obsolete use of "Welsh" in the sense "foreign, non-native", as the species is native to China, though cultivated in many places and naturalized in scattered locations in Eurasia and North America.

Sowing & planting

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Flowering

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Harvestint

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

Caracteristics

Exposition
Water needs
Granulométrie plants.granulometry_3
Frost-resistance Medium
Zone USDA 9a
Height 40 - 60
pH 7

Sow my welsh onion

Outside: Sowing scallions is easy! From April to July, sow in a light and well-drained soil, forming furrows every 10-15 cm and burying the seeds in 1 to 2 cm/1 inch of fresh potting soil. Add compost to the plantation if you want to accelerate development. Inside: You can also sow in nursery, in a clear room whose temperature is around 18 °C. You will keep the soil moist for the first weeks, but never soggy - and transplant these plants to the garden as soon as they have 4 leaves.

Thin out my welsh onion

When your seedling plants reach about ten centimeters, thin out so as to keep only one plant every 40 centimeters, keeping only the most vigorous plants.

Dibble my welsh onion

Transplant seedlings from a greenhouse 7 to 8 weeks after they come up, between May and July depending on the date of sowing. Dig a small hole and fill the bottom with pebbles to avoid drowning the roots. Install the plant very delicately — the roots are still very fragile!

Plant my welsh onion

Prefer a sheltered situation from the full sun and the wind. The soil must be well drained to avoid stagnant water: the best is a substrate made of potting soil, with an addition of 10% sand. Plant every 40 cm. Three plants should suffice for an average consumption.

Water my welsh onion

The scallion enjoys regular watering: in case of drought, it would start to make seeds! (And yes, drought means for him end of summer, that is to say the moment to think about reproduction!) Do not forget it.

Mulch my welsh onion

You can mulch between the plants one to two weeks after planting with the aid of a mulch which holds in moisture. This will limit evaporation from the soil, and thus the need to water and to weed.

Reap my welsh onion

You can pick the spring onion stems all year long! Choose the larger stems preferably by cutting them at the base, to promote the birth of new shoots. Take the opportunity to also remove the wilted stems, and of course those that would produce seeds!

Prune my welsh onion

If your Welsh onion flowers, the stems become hard and unconscious. No problem, prune all the stems to rejuvenate them.

Propagate my welsh onion

The plants from the previous years can hold themselves very well - but a multiplication by tuft division is possible and even recommended when it becomes too big. Unroot it from the pot, and split it in two with a sharp and clean tool. Transplant or replant under the same conditions, adding compost and potting soil - renewal of the substrate will restore vigor to your plants!

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